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Imperative One —
More & Better Teachers:
That Was Then; This Is Now!

Presentation to the State Board of Education
March 17, 2003


That Was Then

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That Was Then

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Florida's Teacher Workforce

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Education Information and Accountability Services, Staff in Florida's Public Schools, Fall 2002


Students and Teachers: Major Racial-Ethnic Groups as Percentage of the Total

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Minority: Trends in Minority Students and Teachers, March 2003


Teacher Shortage:
That Was Then

  • Two years ago, it was estimated that Florida would need 160,000 new teachers in the next 10 years to address enrollment growth and teacher attrition, including the replacement of an aging workforce.

  • Student enrollment estimates have been lowered some since then.


Fall 2003:
This is Now!

Projected Number of Retirements
Classroom Teachers — 2003

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Projections: Estimated Need for Classroom Teachers, 2003-04,March 2003


Fall 2003:
This is Now!

Projected Number of Terminations

Classroom Teachers — 2003

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Projections: Estimated Need for Classroom Teachers, 2003-04,March 2003


Fall 2003:
This is Now!

Projected Number of Classroom Teachers

Needed — 2003

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Projections: Estimated Need for Classroom Teachers,

2003-04,March 2003


RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION


Age of Florida's Teachers

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Education Information and Acountability Services, Staff Survey, February 2002


Florida Teacher Retention 1992-2002
(Includes Retirees)

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Florida Teacher Retention, 1992-2002, March 2003


Percentage of Teachers Ages 20-29
Still in the Classroom Three Years Later

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Florida Teacher Retention, 1992-2002, March 2003


Percentage of Teachers Ages 20-29 Still in the Classroom

Three Years Later: Major Racial-Ethnic Groups

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Florida Teacher Retention, 1992-2002,March 2003


What is Important to Teachers?

National Follow-Up Survey

(Major Sources of Job Dissatisfaction):

  • Low Salaries.

  • Lack Of Support from School Administration / Influence Over Decision Making.

  • Student Discipline / Motivation Problems.

SOURCE: Ingersoll, R.,The Teacher Shortage: A Case of Wrong Diagnosis and Wrong Prescription, NASSP Bulletin, June 2002


2001-2002 Beginning Teacher Salaries Reported by Districts

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State Response to Address Recruitment and Retention Needs

Current Retention Initiatives

  • Increased pay:
    • School Recognition Program.
    • The Florida Mentor Teacher School Pilot Program.
    • Performance Based Pay.
    • Excellent Teaching Program.
    • Advanced Placement Bonus.
    • International Baccalaureate Bonus.
  • Smaller class sizes — Amendment 9.
  • Fewer disruptive students — Teacher Authority Act.
  • More support from school administration:
    • Liability insurance.
    • Use of reasonable force.
    • Teacher Lead Program.
  • Opportunity to work part-time — Allowed in law, Adjunct Certification Program.

Attracting Teachers

  • Troops to Teachers — stipends to eligible former military who enter teaching.
  • Florida Future Educators — 748 chapters.
  • Critical Teacher Shortage Scholarships.
  • Minority Teacher Scholarships.

The Great Florida Teach-In

  • Attendance has doubled since 2000, with 944 attending in 2002.
  • In 2002, 46 states and 8 foreign countries were represented.
  • 408 of these attendees are teaching in Florida public schools. This number represents about 3% of the annual need.

teachinflorida.com

Special Efforts to Recruit and Retain Effective Teachers in Exceptional Education

  • Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) K-20 system of nine Regional Professional Development Partnerships.

  • Florida State Improvement Grant.

Florida State Improvement Grant

  • Competitive U.S. DOE grant awarded to Florida for five-years under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) totaling $7,750,000.
  • Provides funding to the nine partnership projects to impact quantity and quality of personnel serving students with disabilities.

Potential SBE Policy Actions to Enhance Successful Recruitment and Retention

POTENTIAL SBE POLICY ACTION:

  • Support removing five-year cap from DROP to allow teachers and high-performing principals to stay.
    • May help relieve immediate problems in fall 2003.
  • Support beginning teacher salary @ $31,000.
  • Continue to support the Excellent Teaching Program.
  • Support differentiated teacher designations and salaries based on training and performance:
    • Associate Teacher
    • Teacher
    • Senior Teacher
    • Mentor Teacher

Address Leadership:

  • Support the creation of a new executive principal leadership designation for school principals.

Outstanding principals have lower teacher turnover!

  • Support placing experienced teachers in low performing schools.
  • Support the development of a Teacher Lifeline Network to provide on-line support for beginning teachers.
  • Ramp Up Teacher Recruitment:
    • TeachInFlorida.com — Florida's web portal for teacher recruitment and educator support
    • The Great Florida Teach-In — Florida's Annual Teacher Job Fair

  • Support Teacher Scholarship, Loan, and Loan Reimbursement Programs.

    • Support reimbursements for up to 10 years for individuals with undergraduate or graduate degrees in math, science, engineering, and critical teacher shortage areas who teach in critical areas.

    • Support a Teaching Fellows Program: Stipends to encourage graduate students in math, science, engineering, and critical teacher shortage areas to enter the teaching profession.
  • Exert the power of the SBE to forge recruiting partnerships at the highest levels.

PREPARATION AND CERTIFICATION

State-Approved Teacher Education Programs

  • State approval required in Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes.
  • 96 percent pass state certification exams.
  • New teachers and their principals report overall satisfaction with preparation and performance (annual survey: 92.2 percent of teachers satisfied; 94.1 percent of principals).

Teacher Education Programs

  • About 5,600students complete State-approved teacher education programs each year.
  • However, not all completers of these programs end up in Florida public schools classrooms.

2001-02 Teacher Education Graduates:
Number Teaching in Fall 2002

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SOURCE: Florida Department of Education, Office of Policy Research & Improvement, Tracking Teacher Education Graduates to Florida Classrooms — 2001-02,February 2003


The "West Point" Model

  • A Teacher Corps differentiated by:
    • Type and Length of Training
    • Deployment
    • Title
    • Salary Structure
    • Expectations for Retention

Certification

  • Required in Chapter 1012, F.S., and by NCLB.
  • Public expectation for quality and safety:
    • Credential Review.
    • Fingerprints.
  • Content-Rich.
  • Option-Based.

State Certification

  • Two Levels of Certification.
    • Temporary Certificate.
      • Valid for 3 years.
      • Non-renewable.
      • Based upon subject content knowledge.
  • Professional Certificate
    • Valid for 5 years.
    • Renewable.
    • Based upon subject knowledge, general knowledge, professional knowledge, and classroom competency.

Federal Certification Requirements For No Child Left Behind

  • "Highly Qualified" Teacher Standard:

    1. State certification AND

    2. Bachelor's or higher degree AND

    3.  
      • For "new" elementary teachers — rigorous subject area test.
      • For "new" middle/secondary teachers — rigorous subject area test OR a major (equivalent courses).
      • For all "not new" teachers — rigorous subject area test OR a major (equivalent courses) OR performance evaluation (s.1012.34).
  • Effective Dates:
    • Title I School Programs — 2002-03 school year.
    • All Schools — No later than end of 2005-06 .


State Response to Address Preparation and Certification Issues

Certification

  • Flexible:
    • Alternative Certification
      • 2002-03: first-year mandatory statewide implementation.
      • 942 current participants.
      • 6 percent vacancies filled.
    • Adjunct Certification.
    • Reciprocity.

Incentives and Alternative Certification for Instructors with High-Demand Skills

  • "Teach-for-Florida" Grant Opportunity:
    • Emergency recruitment and preparation programs.
  • PreK-20 Partnership Conference: May 9-10
    • Increasing the supply of teachers from under-represented populations, in critical shortage areas, and to teach in the most challenging schools.
    • Possible multi-year grant opportunity for local PK-20 partnerships.


Potential SBE Policy Actions to Enhance Successful Preparation and Certification

POTENTIAL SBE POLICY ACTION:

  • Support flexibility for colleges of education to establish differentiated state-approved teacher preparation programs in order to address differing clientele, emergency programs, etc.
  • Enhance opportunities for alternative preparation programs.

POTENTIAL SBE POLICY ACTION:

  • Improve alignment of teacher education program enrollments with State needs.
  • Support paid internships for teacher candidates.
  • Support "two-year guaranteed" products from state-approved teacher preparation programs.

POTENTIAL SBE POLICY ACTION:

  • Support the continued streamlining of the teacher certification process.
  • Expand alternative certification programs.

PANEL DISCUSSION:

Response of Districts and Institutions of Higher Education